Yvonne Katz, formerly supt. of Beaverton OR and Spring Branch TX school districts, embarrassing retiring Westview High principal Len Case.











Dan Wieden talks about the night he wrote "Just do It" to a fascinated Wesview High School Media Studies class in 2001.

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain conspires with OEA attorney Tom Doyle

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain conspires with OEA attorney Tom Doyle
Chamberlain's three-and-a-half year manipulation of teacher discipline case conceals misconduct of Linda Borquist and Hollis Lekas of the Beaverton School District while interfering with the outcome of a federal lawsuit in support of an attorney formerly employed by the Beaverton School District, Nancy Hungerford.

Oregon ALJ Andrea Sloan collaborates with TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain & OEA atty Tom Doyle

Oregon ALJ Andrea Sloan collaborates with TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain & OEA atty Tom Doyle
"First of its kind in Oregon" decision helps unethical lawyers manipulate federal law suit after Beaverton administrators violated teacher employment contract

Signing a confession to conceal misconduct and influence a federal law suit

Signing a confession to conceal misconduct and influence a federal law suit
Tom Doyle of the OEA collaborates with OAH lawyers and Vickie Chamberlain of the TSPC

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain makes finding based on secret "first of its kind" hearing

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain makes finding based on secret "first of its kind" hearing
Chamberlain's delay protects Nancy Hungerford, former attorney for the Beaverton Schools, who colluded with attorneys for the OEA and the state of Oregon to violate a teacher contract and deny due process in a federal civil suit.

Confederation of Oregon School Administrators

Leadership Academy for Beginning Principals
July 18, 19 and 20, 2007
Linfield College

The Faculty:

Linda Borquist, Academy Coordinator

Victor Musial, Field Operations Director, OSEA

Colin Cameron, Director of Professional Development,COSA

Jill O'Neil, Principal, Beaverton Middle School - OMLA President

Vickie Chamberlain, Executive Director, TSPC

Kris Olsen, Principal, McMinnville High School - OASSA President

Matt Coleman, Principal, Westview High School

Shannon Priem, Communication Services Director, OSBA

Vickie Fleming, Superintendent, Redmond SD 2J

Perla Rodriguez, Principal, Cornelius Elementary School - OMLA President

Shawna Harris, Field Representative, OSEA

Nanci Schneider, NWREL

Craig Hawkins, Communications Director, COSA

Valerie Sebesta, Oregon Education Association

Sally Leet, Principal, Oak Grove Elementary School - OESPA Past President

Brian Traylor, Principal, Corvallis Elementary School - OESPA President

Holly Lekas, Regional Administrator, Beaverton SD 48 Joe Wehrili, OSBA

Michael Carter, Superintendent, Rainier SD 13

Philip McCullum, Director Administrative Licensure, University of Oregon

Authentic evaluation legally dated

Authentic evaluation legally dated
signed by retiring principal Len Case

Post-dated Westview High School evaluation 2002-03

Post-dated Westview High School evaluation 2002-03
Entered fraudulently at Fair Dismissal Appeals Board hearing: Malcolm Dennis (forced resignation; secrecy agreement) and Chris Bick, signing principals

Like a family torn by unspoken shame...Beaverton School Board has a Full Agenda

Beaverton School Board has a Full Agenda By Wendy Owen, The Oregonian 
on February 20, 2012
http://www.oregonlive.com/beaverton/index.ssf/2012/02/beaverton_school_board_has_a_f.html

Like a family torn by unspoken shame, the Beaverton School Board will assemble publicly and behave as if all is well at home. A brave public face.

These folks, with vast influence and power over the livelihoods of so many Beaverton citizens, will make decisions tonight that will affect the futures of hundreds--no, thousands of others.

The agenda will include a visit from a prominent state-level education official so the publicity will be heightened. This is BSD PR whiz Maureen Wheeler at work.

Everyone will put on a brave face, occasionally fidgeting and looking away from all the cameras, and all of them will try to forget, for a while, the secrets they keep.

Secrets that led to Ms. Shultz's departure. Secrets that maintain the facade of functionality for a VERY expensive public enterprise.

But Lisa is leaving...and why?

Mr. Ben Cannon, the new face of Oregon education reform, will address an assortment of people gathered tonight. Many of these educators and board members are prominent in our community, but they are people who have systematically placed themselves first in line at the Beaverton public education buffet for many years.

An identifiable problem Mr. Cannon could easily address in his public appearance tonight is the number of conflicts-of-interests that are present when the Beaverton School District leadership congregates.

And how much money the secretive BSD leaders are able to spend unaccountably, to hide unsavory personnel issues that might taint Ms. Wheeler's scripted public images.

A lot of big decisons will be made when the Family gets together tonight...

But Lisa is leaving...and why?

Without oversight and accountability for school administrators in the Beaverton School District, education reform is smokescreen hypocrisy that taxpayers can no longer afford.

The Beaverton School Board has a packed agenda Tuesday night, ranging from a presentation by Gov. Kitzhaber's education advisor and appointing a new school board member to decisions on eminent domain and student transfers.
The meeting begins at 6:30 p.m. and is estimated to end around 10 p.m. at the district administration office.
Ben Cannon, Education Advisor to Governor John Kitzhaber, will speak about proposed changes and reforms to the State Educational Model, which includes 40-40-20 Goal, No Child Left Behind waiver application, district achievement compacts, among other topics.
The board will discuss the new out-of-district student transfer law, and the options Beaverton is considering related to the law, passed by the 2011 Legislature.
Until the law passed, a family needed permission from both their home school district and the school district where they wanted to enroll their child before the student could transfer to the new district. If a home district refused to release the student, the family could pay roughly $6,000 in tuition to attend the new school or stay at the home district for free.
School boards have until March 1 to declare how many seats at each school they are willing to offer to students outside their boundaries.
The board will also make a decision on whether to use its eminent domain authority to obtain property for a future high school. The property is north of SW Scholls Ferry Road and Roy Rogers Road.

The board will receive updates on the Whitford Middle School standards-based learning pilot, which is a proficiency-based program for students.

See: "RETIRING TEACHERS CREATE SCHOOL SURPLUS"
Anitha Reddy Oregonian October 28, 2004

See also: TeachingintheShadowoftheSwoosh.blogspot.com


Beaverton School District teacher transfer fix has $34,000 price tag

http://www.oregonlive.com/beaverton/index.ssf/2013/08/beaverton_school_district_teac_1.html

By Wendy Owen 
Oregonian 
Aug 8, 2013
Linda Borquist seeking "inner peace" (?!?)
while double-dipping

Beaverton School District promised its teachers, parents and students that it would remedy the transfer fiasco of the past school year.
Most teachers would be placed in positions of their choice, or at least one better suited to their experience, and all of the new transfers would know their tentative fall placement by the end of the past school year.
The district came through with its promise. About 380 teachers were transferred to new positions. But that came with a $34,000 price tag.
The district hired its former associate superintendent for human resources, Linda Borquist, for assistance, paying her $157 an hour, plus expenses for 23 days -- about $1,480 a day.
Human resources staff needed help getting the transfers in place after the department learned it was losing the administrator who handles teacher transfers, Mark Moser.
Borquist, who retired from the district in 2006, is a professional human resources consultant and has worked with other school districts.
"We felt it was important to inform teachers of tentative placements before they left for the summer," said Sue Robertson, chief human resources officer. "With Mark leaving mid-June, it wouldn't be possible without support."  
Moser was hired by the North Clackamas School District.
More than 350 teachers were transferred late last summer and fall as 204 layoffs created a massive domino effect across the 51-school Beaverton district. Many teachers were moved into classrooms or grade levels in which they had no experience.
This time, teachers were asked where they would like to be placed, and principals were part of the process, unlike last school year.
Beaverton did not go through a competitive bid process for the consultant job.
"It is not required under personal services contracts if it is less than $75,000," Robertson said in an email.
Beaverton sought Borquist because she had previous experience with human resources in the district.
"We needed someone who was fast and efficient," Robertson said. "There are not enough people to do the work."
Robertson said Borquist worked three days a week between eight and 12 hours a day, helping Moser find placements for teachers.
"This involved filling openings or making transfers based on teacher requests, principal input, teacher experience data, licensure and (federal highly qualified) data," Robertson said. "The best way to describe it is as putting together a three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle."
Borquist, whose most recent known address is in Sisters, could not be reached for comment.
The $157 an hour that Borquist charged the district would be the equivalent of $326,500 a year. Beaverton Superintendent Jeff Rose makes $193,000 a year.
But the fee isn't outrageous for a human resources consultant on a job that requires expertise, said Judy Clark, president of HR Answers Inc. in Tualatin.
Clark equated the work to a large recruitment project. "That rate is not unusual for that work," she said.
Portland Public Schools has paid a human resources consultant, Yvonne Deckard, $15,000 a month since July 2012 -- about $180,000 a year -- and recently extended the contract for her work, negotiating with the district's unions.
Robertson said the $34,000 for Borquist's work was paid for with funds from Robertson's office.
Meanwhile, Beaverton continues its hiring process to bring back 151 teachers, the result of a voter-approved, local option levy that will bring about $15 million annually for five years.
Fewer than two dozen teachers remained on the layoff list in late July. Most have been brought back to the district or found jobs elsewhere, Robertson said.  
In addition, teachers who could not be transferred and remained unhappy with their placements also applied for the jobs.
The juggling of teachers will continue into the start of the upcoming school year, Robertson said.
-- Wendy Owen

Oregon schools pack in more students per teacher than any state except California, new report says

Oregon schools enrolled 21.8 students for every teacher in fall 2012, worse than all other states except California, according to the latest school statistics and rankings compiled by the National Education Association.
For many years, Oregon has ranked third- or fourth-worst among states when it comes to student-teacher ratios. But the new NEA rankings estimate that Oregon has surpassed Utah to make its teachers second-most-overloaded among states.
The Oregonian has covered the issue of class sizes and student-teacher ratiosin several recent articles.
Several factors help explain why Oregon schools are so jam-packed with students and light on teachers.
  • Oregon funds schools with less money per student than the national average (about $10,250 per student in 2012-13 compared with about $10,900 nationally, these NEA estimates say). The national teachers union's researchers estimate Oregon's spending was 6 percent below the national average.
  • Oregon pays its teachers more than the national average: $57,600 on average, compared with the national average teacher pay of $56,100, the NEA says. That means Oregon teachers are paid about 3 percent more than the national average.
  • Oregon school employees get some of the most generous health and retirement benefits in the country. Not all school employees get the same benefits, however, even though school districts are billed a uniform rate for all employees. Employees and retirees who were hired before 1996 get rich retirement benefits; those hired more recently will get scaled back benefits.
-- Betsy Hammond
betsyhammond@oregonian.com

Oregon schools chief Rob Saxton never met 130-hour requirement for high school courses while superintendent of Tigard-Tualatin schools

  Betsy Hammond  March 17, 2014  http://www.oregonlive.com/education/index.ssf/2014/03/oregon_schools_chief_rob_saxto_2.html#incart_rive
Saxton2006.jpg
Back when he was superintendent of Tigard-Tualatin schools, Rob Saxton mistakenly thought the district's high schools met the state requirement that courses last 130 hours. They did not. (Stephanie Yao Long / The Oregonian / 2006)
Betsy Hammond | betsyhammond@oregonian.comBy Betsy Hammond | betsyhammond@oregonian.com 
Email the author | Follow on Twitter
on March 17, 2014 at 12:45 PM, updated March 17, 2014 at 12:47 PM
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During seven years as superintendent of Tigard-Tualatin schoolsRob Saxtonnever brought the district's two high schools into compliance with a state rulerequiring high school courses to last at least 130 hours.
Saxton, now chief of all Oregon schools, ruled last week that Portland Public Schools was "deficient" for not meeting that requirement. If Portland and other districts don't add hours to their schedules by fall, the credits they issue to students will be "invalid" and they could lose state funding, he warned.
Saxton told The Oregonian Monday that he believed, mistakenly, that Tigard High and Tualatin High met the 130 hour requirement while he was in charge.
In fact, they have broken that rule for nearly 20 years, since they instituted an eight-period schedule in the mid-1990s to try to offer students enough course sections despite budget contraints from from voter-approved property tax reductions and limits.
Saxton, a former high school math teacher, said he never did the math calculations himself to test whether the high school schedules were in compliance. Had he done so (classes meet 90 minutes every other day for 170 days), he would have concluded that Tigard-Tualatin courses last less than 126 hours per year, and perhaps significantly so, once assemblies and late-start days are taken into account.
Had he realized earlier that the courses were too short, either on his own or from a whistler-blower bringing it to his attention, he would have fixed it, he said Monday. In 2012, Gov. John Kitzhaber named Saxton to be the state's first appointed schools chief, based in large part on his track record at Tigard-Tualatin.
Saxton reiterated Monday that he expects his former district's new leaders, and leaders of all other Oregon districts, to tweak their schedules if needed to ensure all high school courses meet for 130 hours beginning in September. He is serious, he said, that the 130 hour rule helps ensure students get the teaching they deserve.
"If someone had said to me we were not beyond the 130 hours, I would have said, 'Let's go to work and fix this.' It's something that can be fixed."
He said schools need to examine how many minutes they allot to pass from class to class, when the school day starts and ends, when they schedule teaching training and planning time and how often they hold assemblies, among other factors.
"I am not against assemblies. I am not for them necessarily either," Saxton said. "It is reasonable to have some assemblies but they need to be very measured, very well though out and with the return in mind."

Kitchen Sink Project: How Beaverton School Administrators Fire Teachers Who Ask for Equity






Janet Hogue, then CEO of the BSD's fundraising organization, the BEF...

Janet Hogue, then CEO of the BSD's  fundraising organization, the BEF...
...representing herself as superintendent.

Oct 06 letter from new BSD HR director Sue Robertson

Oct 06 letter from new BSD HR director Sue Robertson
...blocking access to evidence that would demonstrate Beaverton administrative misconduct.

Response to Sue Robertson, BSD HR chief, concerning false allegations to conceal misconduct

Response to Sue Robertson, BSD HR chief, concerning false allegations to conceal misconduct

Letter from Jennifer Hungerford, former Beaverton atty referencing BSD money manager Dan Thomas

Letter from Jennifer Hungerford, former Beaverton atty referencing BSD money manager Dan Thomas

Hollis Lekas, former Beaverton HR admin., June 2004 "complaint" to TSPC...

Hollis Lekas, former Beaverton HR admin., June 2004 "complaint" to TSPC...
...after waiting on FDAB results.

Justice delayed...

Justice delayed...

...is justice denied, Tom Doyle-style

...is justice denied, Tom Doyle-style

Former TSPC investigator Nisbet working unethically with Tom Doyle, OEA atty

Former TSPC investigator Nisbet working unethically with Tom Doyle, OEA atty
Her actions were designed to affect the outcome of a federal lawsuit. She lost her job consequently (Like me, she was small enough to fail). The improper use of TSPC "stipulations" and "pass-the-trash" deals effectively lets lawyers and bureaucrats in Oregon education play "God" with student welfare and teacher careers...

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain trying to work a "deal" with Doyle

TSPC director Vickie Chamberlain trying to work a "deal" with Doyle
Signing stipulations to protect BSD administrators who violated employment and civil rights laws

OEA Legal Conceals Fraud

OEA Legal Conceals Fraud
Mark Toledo tries to cover up for Tom Doyle

Former OEA President Larry Wolf denial of illegal civil suit filed by OEA atty Tom Doyle

Former OEA President Larry Wolf denial of illegal civil suit filed by OEA atty Tom Doyle
Wolf abdicates leadership of union's membership to OEA "Advocacy"